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Review: Woody Allen's Midnight in Paris - The Annals of Young Geoffrey: Hope brings a turtle [entries|archive|friends|userinfo]
Young Geoffrey

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Review: Woody Allen's Midnight in Paris [Mar. 14th, 2012|03:21 pm]
Young Geoffrey
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'Midnight in Paris' poster

It seems like the American cinema comes up with a good time travel film of a certain kind once every decade or so — Peggy Sue Got Married and Pleasantville come immediately to mind, as does Groundhog Day, in its own way.

Not strictly-speaking science fiction, these movies are more like fables, presenting time travel as an arbitrary fact which allows their protagonists to learn some life lesson, sometimes leading to acceptance of what is, more often leading to some sort of important life change.

That grand old man of American cinema, Woody Allen, is the latest to offer us a nostalgia-steeped visit to the past, along with a cinematic love-letter to a city that is not New York (for a change), but Paris. Paris now and, especially, Paris then.

The Oscar-winning Midnight In Paris has become Allen's most financially successful movie. Though flawed, it is the work of a master-crasftmen that tells its slender tale with style and efficiency, generating laughs and dramatic tension despite its decidedly old-fashioned pacing.

Does it deserve its awards and critical acclaim as Woody Allen's return to form? Click here for my full review (yes, with spoilers), Twilight of an auteur.

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Comments:
[User Picture]From: james_nicoll
2012-03-14 07:29 pm (UTC)
I would not call Pleasantville time travel.
(Reply) (Thread)
[User Picture]From: ed_rex
2012-03-15 04:06 am (UTC)

A distinction without significance

Pleasantville certainly involved a sort of time travel. Would you be happier if I called it "slipstream"?
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