?

Log in

The Annals of Young Geoffrey: Hope brings a turtle [entries|archive|friends|userinfo]
Young Geoffrey

[ Website | Edifice Rex Online ]
[ Info | livejournal userinfo ]
[ Archive | journal archive ]

Links
[Links:| EdificeRex Online ]

My tweets [May. 30th, 2016|12:01 pm]
Young Geoffrey
[Tags|]

linkPost comment

My tweets [May. 29th, 2016|03:13 pm]
Young Geoffrey
[Tags|]

linkPost comment

My tweets [May. 27th, 2016|04:00 pm]
Young Geoffrey
[Tags|]

linkPost comment

My tweets [May. 25th, 2016|12:01 pm]
Young Geoffrey
[Tags|]

link2 comments|Post comment

My tweets [May. 24th, 2016|06:14 pm]
Young Geoffrey
[Tags|]

link2 comments|Post comment

My tweets [May. 23rd, 2016|06:16 am]
Young Geoffrey
[Tags|]

linkPost comment

My tweets [May. 21st, 2016|12:01 pm]
Young Geoffrey
[Tags|]

linkPost comment

My tweets [May. 20th, 2016|12:01 pm]
Young Geoffrey
[Tags|]

linkPost comment

My tweets [May. 19th, 2016|12:01 pm]
Young Geoffrey
[Tags|]

linkPost comment

Dis ability: The Old Woman's Toilet Troubles [May. 19th, 2016|03:56 am]
Young Geoffrey
[Tags|, , , , , , ]

My mother came down from Sudbury

"No spring chicken" teaches lessons in accessibility

Image: Photo of Geoffrey Dow with Benita Hart, his mother

My mother is a cripple (her word, not mine). She's 83 years old, has two bionic knees and one of those is ... loose. Falling apart, she says, and the surgeons in Sudbury (all of whom work out of the same practice, so no shopping around for a second opinion unless you're willing to shop for one in Toronto or Ottawa) say she's too old for a replacement.

Despite that mechanical failure and a spine giving way to osteoporosis, and despite some problems with short-term memory (not, so far as I can tell, early-stage Alzheimer's or some other kind of dementia; but disconcerting nevertheless), her doctor tells her she's mostly in very good health and has every chance of seeing her 95th birthday.

She is, further, having the time of her life as a born-again celebrity of sorts (if only in Northern Ontario) and has made of her late uncle Jules' saying, "life is good", her own touchstone.

Image: Banner from CBC Sudbury"s feature page for Benita Hart and "Growing Old Ungracefully".

Last week, a friend was driving down to Ottawa and wondered if she would care to accompany him. Travelling isn't as easy for her as it used to be, but she said yes, and so arrived in Ottawa last Thursday. And I saw her on Sunday.

* * *

A lot of people find my relationship with my mother a little strange. We actually like each quite a lot, as people as well as as mother and son, yet we probably don't see each other as often as once a year, we seldom email and, unless she's having computer issues (I have her running Linux Mint, so I'm her go-to guy for support when something's not working), we probably only talk on the phone every three or four months.

But those conversations usually last between two and four hours, and include healthy exchanges of politics and philosophy along with a a lot of laughter (and a little gossip), so I'm not bothered. And neither is she. After all, we both have lives.

Anyway.

She had asked about staying with me and Raven, but I had to remind her that inhabit the top two floors of a three-story town house. Though she's taken up distance walking through the good offices of a physiotherapist and a walker, her knees aren't up to a flight of stairs every time she wants to use the bathroom.

So, as I said, she stayed with a friend. And meanwhile, I had a friend of mine come into town on Thursday, whom I hadn't seen in 22 years. Since Sonia was only passing through town, I invited her to dinner and she stayed the night on our couch after we caught up and reminisced as old friends long out of touch will do. (It wasn't only the passing of time that was shocking about our reunion; it was also how many memories we did not share in common. Or, as Sonia put it, how lousy my memory was. Somehow, over the years, I had come to think of her as some sort of weird, near-celibate girl who was forever single; she had to reminded me that I'd met at least two of her boy-friends. But onwards. This entry is about Mom, and the lesson she taught me about accessibility issues.

You weren't expect a lesson, were you Gentle Reader?

I had work on Friday and Saturday, so it was only on Sunday afternoon, after my soccer game, that I actually saw me old mum in the flesh.

Image: Photo of Geoffrey Dow with Benita Hart, his mother, and her walker.

Cognizant of how difficult it can be for cripples the handicapped to get in and out of small cars, I'd foregone my usual compact in favour of renting a minivan, and it was in that vehicle that my mum, Raven and I set out for dinner, on the way detouring past our home, the inside of which my mother will never set foot.

We wanted to go to Saffron, a Persian eatery which — to our surprise if not quite shock — seems to no longer exist. We ended up at the Golden India restaurant, a Bangladeshi-style Indian restaurant on McArthur. Raven and I have been a couple of times before and found it far and away the best Indian food we've had in Ottawa. The dishes are subtly flavourful, even when "extremely" hot. (I ordered the brilliant Bangalore Pal and didn't regret a drop of the sweat I lost over it.)

But the good food and conversation were marred by a post-prandial occurrence.

Though the bathrooms were on the main floor, it turned out they were not, quite, accessible. The toilet, my mum said, was extremely low. There were no grab-bars. She very nearly had to call for help, just to get up off the shitter.

The things the able-bodied don't think about! (And despite my problems with arthritis, able-bodied is still how I think of myself!)

The restaurant's hostess apologized when my mother complained, but it was pretty pro forma. "No one else has ever complained," she said.

"Most people probably just don't come back," was my mother's response. And no doubt, she's right. Unlike my mother, most people don't want to make a fuss. Hell, my mother doesn't "want" to make a fuss either, but she (quite rightly) thinks that fusses sometimes need to be made.

Anyway, the incident left me contemplating the place we'd tried to take her the last time she was in town, the sometimes sublime Chahaya Malaysia. A low-key, mom-and-pop style restaurant serving brilliant food, it is a also one of those places whose bathrooms are in the basement. Tough shit for the handicapped. And a good thing it was closed the time we tried to introduce my mum to its brilliant food.

But the moral of the story is, even when we think we're aware of issues having to do with social justice, it's really damned easy to miss the things that don't affect us personally in some way. If you've ever wondered why the toilets in old folks' homes are so high, or the seats have risers, now you know: when the knees are going, standing up is no easy thing.

Thanks, mum. I hope you had a good drive back on Monday. Presumably, if something went wrong, one of my brothers would have called by now to let me know.

This entry was originally posted at http://ed-rex.dreamwidth.org/281252.html. Comment there using OpenID, or here as per normal.

link2 comments|Post comment

My tweets [May. 18th, 2016|12:01 pm]
Young Geoffrey
[Tags|]

link4 comments|Post comment

My tweets [May. 17th, 2016|03:10 pm]
Young Geoffrey
[Tags|]

linkPost comment

My tweets [May. 15th, 2016|12:01 pm]
Young Geoffrey
[Tags|]

link2 comments|Post comment

My tweets [May. 12th, 2016|12:01 pm]
Young Geoffrey
[Tags|]

linkPost comment

My tweets [May. 10th, 2016|11:37 pm]
Young Geoffrey
[Tags|]

linkPost comment

My tweets [May. 9th, 2016|06:04 pm]
Young Geoffrey
[Tags|]

linkPost comment

My tweets [May. 8th, 2016|03:12 pm]
Young Geoffrey
[Tags|]

linkPost comment

My tweets [May. 7th, 2016|12:01 pm]
Young Geoffrey
[Tags|]

linkPost comment

My tweets [May. 6th, 2016|12:01 pm]
Young Geoffrey
[Tags|]

linkPost comment

My tweets [May. 5th, 2016|12:01 pm]
Young Geoffrey
[Tags|]

linkPost comment

navigation
[ viewing | most recent entries ]
[ go | earlier ]